Rikers CO Busted for Smuggling Drugs

Rikers Island corrections officer, Kevin McKoy, found himself on the receiving end of a pair of handcuffs when he was arrested for trying to smuggle drugs and scalpel blades into the prison.
Nina Fenton
Published on

Corrections officers at New York’s Rikers Island prison usually spend their shifts trying to keep drugs and weapons away from inmates. Unless of course the officer in question is Kevin McKoy who clearly missed the segment discussing contraband during orientation. The three year veteran corrections officer was busted during a routine shift change when he was found to have a substantial amount of drug contraband and weaponry secreted away in his pant legs.

McKoy clearly did not anticipate being on the receiving end of a heightened search when he entered the Anna M. Kross Center for his 3 p.m. Shift on Tuesday. It’s likely that the officers conducting the search were equally as shocked to find 16 very carefully placed packages containing seven scalpel blades wrapped in black tape crammed inside the fingers of latex gloves that were packed with over 120.5 grams of green-colored synthetic marijuana, 5.9 grams of pink synthetic marijuana and 10 suboxone strips.

His stash of drugs didn’t end there, though. Investigators went on a veritable treasure hunt where they hit pay dirt in McKoy’s car where 247 grams of organic marijuana was found and an additional 101 grams of synthetic marijuana, 18 more suboxone strips, nine scalpel blades, ½ gram of cocaine and 58.4 grams of loose tobacco. It’s not entirely clear as of yet what McKoy was doing with such a hefty stash of drugs, but investigators are pretty confident that his intentions were to unload them during his shifts at the prison. Thankfully his supply was seized before he was able to contribute to the already out of hand K2 epidemic in New York more than he may have already.

“This arrest continues DOI’s focus on stopping one of the root causes of violence at Rikers – the flow of weapons and drugs, particularly by correction officers. Law enforcement professionals who choose to bring in weapons and drugs are fueling the illegal and dangerous activity that is hurting other correction officers and undermining safety in the jails. It must stop and DOI will work with its partners to make sure it does,” said DOI Commissioner Mark Peters of McKoys bust, which raises the tally of Rikers Island staff members who have been arrested or received disciplinary action for corruption since 2014 to 51.

McKoy is in a whole heap of trouble as he faces having 20 felony charges levied against him and is likely facing a decent amount of prison time as a result. At least he’ll have plenty of time to think about how it all went south while he waits in a jail cell with a $25,000 bail just waiting to be paid, which he may find difficult to pay now that he’s been suspended from his position without pay.

WRITTEN BY

Nina works hard to be a voice to the voiceless whose stories about drug testing, DNA testing and paternity deserve to be told. It is her goal to always come from a place free of judgment and full of compassion.

WRITTEN BY

Nina works hard to be a voice to the voiceless whose stories about drug testing, DNA testing and paternity deserve to be told. It is her goal to always come from a place free of judgment and full of compassion.

FEATURED IN

Drug Testing

Read Health Street's dramatic and informative drug testing stories.

FEATURED IN

Drug Testing

Read Health Street's dramatic and informative drug testing stories.