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Austin Occupational Health Services

Austin occupational health policies are crucial for employers in industries at high risk for accidents, injuries, and exposure to communicable diseases or hazardous chemicals. Employers must remain compliant with workplace occupational health laws to ensure the safety of their workers. Austin occupational health policies should include proper training, pre-employment testing, and safe equipment, among others. Austin occupational health services include employment physicals, titer testing, TB tests, respiratory screenings and immunizations.

Although there are no Austin Occupational health state-specific laws, employers must remain compliant under federal laws. The Federal Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) established the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970, requiring private-sector employers to adopt safe workplace policies to keep the workplace free of recognizable hazards. Austin employers and employees must follow federal OSHA guidelines.

The Occupational Health and Safety Program protects contractors working on ROCIP projects in the city. The program enforces compliance with federal, Texas, and Austin occupational health guidelines. It provides inspections, proper training, and provisions for an Emergency Action Plan.

Although Texas employers must follow OSHA guidelines, they do not preempt local Austin or Texas plans that offer greater benefits or protection for employees. Employers must become familiar with local, state, and federal workplace occupational health laws.

Health Street offers a variety of Austin occupational health services. Simply click the button below to register online. If you would like to schedule your appointment via phone or have any questions, please reach us at (512) 675-2588.

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Austin Occupational Health Laws, Acts, and Legislation

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Texas Health and Safety Code Section 81.042 requires some employers to report communicable diseases to local health authorities. Under Austin occupational health regulations, employees required to report communicable diseases include registered nurses, dentists, school authorities, physicians, administrators of home health agencies, administrators of education, health professionals, superintendents of public or private institutions, health officials of correctional facilities, and emergency medical personnel.
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Texas Health and Safety Code Sec. 256.001 requires hospital and nursing home employers to develop policies regarding the handling and moving of patients. The policy must include strategies to reduce the risk of injury to employees and patients while moving, transferring, repositioning, or lifting patients.
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The Texas Health and Safety Code Sec. 502.002 requires employers to provide information to employees about any hazardous chemicals they might be exposed to while performing work duties.
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Austin occupational health regulations require employers of healthcare institutions to make available the hepatitis B vaccine series to all employees at occupational risk of exposure.
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Austin occupational health services in healthcare facilities are required to implement policies to prevent vaccine-preventable diseases. The policy must require employees to receive vaccines that protect against vaccine-preventable diseases, specify which vaccines covered employees must take, and exemption procedures. Employers might consider titer testing (antibody testing) to determine immunity for employees seeking vaccine exemptions, or to prevent duplicate or unnecessary vaccines.
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Austin workplace health laws require drivers of commercial motor vehicles to be physically examined by a medical examiner. Employees must keep a current Medical Examiner Certificate on file and have it renewed every 24 months or sooner if required by the medical examiner.
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Austin workplace health policies require that applicants for the Austin Police department undergo specific testing to become hired. Testing includes background checks, drug testing, a polygraph examination, and a psychological examination. Once these are complete, applicants must receive a medical examination and general fitness assessment.
The information provided on this page is intended for informational purposes only, and should not be used in place of legal counsel in the relevant jurisdiction.

Austin Antibody Testing

The COVID-19 Antibody Test checks for antibodies in a person’s blood that protect against SARS-CoV-2. Use this test to determine if Austin employees have previously recovered from COVID-19 or received a COVID-19 vaccine.

Hepatitis A infections can be spread via water, food, and close contact with individuals who are infected. Although it can be prevented by vaccination, people who are not vaccinated against Hepatitis A and do not have the antibodies to protect against this virus may be at risk for liver infections. If proof of Hepatitis A immunity is required for an employer in Austin, this antibody test can be ordered.

Individuals who do not have antibodies that protect against Hepatitis B may be at risk for serious or even fatal liver infection. This virus can be contracted from bodily fluids, such as blood or semen. The Hepatitis B Antibody Test can determine if a person has immunity against this virus.

Similar to Hepatitis A and B, Hepatitis C infections can also result in complications with the liver. Hepatitis C infection is spread via blood, and therefore is most often a result of using contaminated equipment (such as needles). For people who need proof of Hepatitis C immunity or are unsure of their vaccination status, the Hepatitis C Antibody Test can detect the appropriate antibodies in the blood.

Left untreated, some hepatitis infections can cause liver damage, inflammation, and other serious health complications. The below bundle tests a person’s blood for immunity against all three types of hepatitis viruses.

MMR antibody testing is used to determine if a person has immunity against measles, mumps, and rubella.

More commonly known as Chickenpox, the varicella-zoster virus is a highly contagious virus that can be easily spread via air, skin, saliva, and surfaces. Since infection or vaccination frequently occurs at a young age, individuals may be unsure of their vaccination status. This test can be used to confirm whether a person has antibodies against the varicella virus.

This is a package deal that covers a wide range of antibody testing, including varicella (Chickenpox), measles, mumps, rubella, and hepatitis B.

As our most comprehensive package for antibody testing, this option is a great choice for people in Austin who are looking for proof of immunity or for more information about their vaccination status. The Total Antibody Package includes antibody testing for hepatitis A, hepatitis B, hepatitis C, varicella (Chickenpox), measles, mumps, and rubella.

Citations

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“OSHA – Workplace Safety and Health Requirements.” Texas Workforce Commission, https://www.twc.texas.gov/news/efte/osha.html
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“ROCIP Safety Manual.” City of Austin, https://www.austintexas.gov/sites/default/files/files/Contract_Management/Construction_Bid_Docs/ROCIP_Safety_Manual__09-13_.pdf
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“State Immunization Laws for Healthcare Workers and Patients – Immunization Administration Requirements for State: TX.” Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), https://www2a.cdc.gov/vaccines/statevaccsApp/Administration.asp?statetmp=TX#256
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“Commercial Driver License (CDL) Medical Certification Requirement.” Texas Department of Public Safety, https://www.dps.texas.gov/section/driver-license/commercial-driver-license-cdl-medical-certification-requirement
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“Hiring Process.” Austin Police Department Recruiting, https://www.apdrecruiting.org/hiring-process
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“Rule §96.202. Exposure Control Plan.” Texas Administrative Code, https://texreg.sos.state.tx.us/public/readtac$ext.TacPage?sl=T&app=9&p_dir=N&p_rloc=184679&p_tloc=&p_ploc=1&pg=2&p_tac=&ti=25&pt=1&ch=96&rl=201
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“Rule §1.702. Vaccine Preventable Diseases Policy.” Texas Administrative Code, https://texreg.sos.state.tx.us/public/readtac$ext.TacPage?sl=R&app=9&p_dir=&p_rloc=&p_tloc=&p_ploc=&pg=1&p_tac=&ti=25&pt=1&ch=1&rl=702
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“29 U.S. Code Chapter 15 – Occupational Safety and Health.” Cornell Law School, https://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/text/29/chapter-15
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“Texas Health and Safety Code Section 81.042.” Texas Statutes, https://statutes.capitol.texas.gov/Docs/HS/htm/HS.81.htm#81.042
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“Texas Health and Safety Code Sec. 256.001.” Texas Statutes, https://statutes.capitol.texas.gov/Docs/HS/htm/HS.256.htm
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“The Texas Health and Safety Code Sec. 502.002.” Texas Statutes, https://statutes.capitol.texas.gov/Docs/HS/htm/HS.502.htm