Anchorage Occupational Health Services - info-hero

Anchorage Occupational Health Services

Workplace occupational health plans help employers to remain compliant with occupational health laws and protect their employees from accidents, injuries, and fatalities in the workplace. Employees are entitled to a safe and healthy workplace, free from recognizable hazards, and it is the employer’s job to ensure their safety with a workplace occupational health plan. In Anchorage, occupational health services include biometric screenings, vaccinations, titer testing (antibody testing), employment and pre-employment physical exams, respiratory health screening, vision and hearing screening, tuberculosis (TB) screening and TB skin tests, respiratory fit testing, and proper training and education. Employers must remove recognizable hazards in the workplace when possible and provide their employees with safe, working equipment and proper personal protective equipment (PPE).

Anchorage occupational health laws are overseen by Alaska Occupational Safety and Health (AKOSH), which sets laws and regulations for private and public employers in Anchorage and the state of Alaska. AKOSH has adopted most of the guidelines set by the federal Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), with additional, Alaska-specific laws. Anchorage occupational health laws set by AKOSH help to reduce workplace injuries, illnesses, and fatalities. The enforcement section of AKOSH provides inspections and issues citations for workplace occupational health violations. The program also provides free education and assistance to help employers recognize and evaluate workplace hazards.

Health Street offers a variety of Anchorage occupational health services. Simply click the button below to register online. If you would like to schedule your appointment via phone or have any questions, please reach us at (907) 313-2282.

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Anchorage Occupational Health Laws, Acts, and Legislation

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Alaska Statutes, Title 18 applies to asbestos, explosive handlers, and hazardous painting.
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The Alaska Administrative Code, Title 8, Chapter 61 provides Anchorage occupational health laws. Article 1 addresses the adoption of standards. Article 2 addresses inspections, citations, and penalties.
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8 AAC 61.100. offers regulations for imminent danger, defined by the statute as “a condition or practice in a place of employment which could reasonably be expected to cause death or serious physical harm, either immediately or before the imminence of such danger can be eliminated through the enforcement procedures.” This law states that if a representative concludes that a condition or practice causes imminent danger, the employer and employees must be notified immediately and take action or offer a recommendation to remove the danger.
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Anchorage workplace health laws include federal OSHA’s 29 C.F.R. 1904, Sections 1904.0-1904.38 and 1904.40-1904.46. These regulations include recordkeeping for needlestick and sharps injuries, and reporting fatality, injury, and illnesses information to the government.
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Workplace occupational health laws in Anchorage also include federal OSHA’s 29 C.F.R. 1910. These laws include the adoption and extension of federal standards for construction work and special provisions for air contaminants.
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Workplace occupational health laws include 29 C.F.R. 1926 of federal OSHA’s regulations, sections 1926.10-1926.29, 1926.31-1926.1153, 1926.1200-1926.1213, and 1926.1400-1926.1442, which covers fire protection and intervention, first aid and medical attention, personal protective equipment, employee emergency action plans, occupational noise exposure, exposure to radiation, gases, vapors, fumes, dusts, and mists, COVID-19, and hazard communication. In Anchorage, workplace health laws also include Subpart CC- Cranes and Derricks in Construction. This section includes wire rope, power line safety, fall protection, and work area control.
The information provided on this page is intended for informational purposes only, and should not be used in place of legal counsel in the relevant jurisdiction.

Anchorage Antibody Testing

The COVID-19 Antibody Test checks for antibodies in a person’s blood that protect against SARS-CoV-2. Use this test to determine if Anchorage employees have previously recovered from COVID-19 or received a COVID-19 vaccine.

Hepatitis A infections can be spread via water, food, and close contact with individuals who are infected. Although it can be prevented by vaccination, people who are not vaccinated against Hepatitis A and do not have the antibodies to protect against this virus may be at risk for liver infections. If proof of Hepatitis A immunity is required for an employer in Anchorage, this antibody test can be ordered.

Individuals who do not have antibodies that protect against Hepatitis B may be at risk for serious or even fatal liver infection. This virus can be contracted from bodily fluids, such as blood or semen. The Hepatitis B Antibody Test can determine if a person has immunity against this virus.

Similar to Hepatitis A and B, Hepatitis C infections can also result in complications with the liver. Hepatitis C infection is spread via blood, and therefore is most often a result of using contaminated equipment (such as needles). For people who need proof of Hepatitis C immunity or are unsure of their vaccination status, the Hepatitis C Antibody Test can detect the appropriate antibodies in the blood.

Left untreated, some hepatitis infections can cause liver damage, inflammation, and other serious health complications. The below bundle tests a person’s blood for immunity against all three types of hepatitis viruses.

MMR antibody testing is used to determine if a person has immunity against measles, mumps, and rubella.

More commonly known as Chickenpox, the varicella-zoster virus is a highly contagious virus that can be easily spread via air, skin, saliva, and surfaces. Since infection or vaccination frequently occurs at a young age, individuals may be unsure of their vaccination status. This test can be used to confirm whether a person has antibodies against the varicella virus.

This is a package deal that covers a wide range of antibody testing, including varicella (Chickenpox), measles, mumps, rubella, and hepatitis B.

As our most comprehensive package for antibody testing, this option is a great choice for people in Anchorage who are looking for proof of immunity or for more information about their vaccination status. The Total Antibody Package includes antibody testing for hepatitis A, hepatitis B, hepatitis C, varicella (Chickenpox), measles, mumps, and rubella.

Citations

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“Alaska Occupational Safety and Health (AKOSH).” Alaska Department of Labor and Workforce Development, https://labor.alaska.gov/lss/oshhome.htm
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“Alaska Occupational Safety and Health (AKOSH) – Quick Guide to Statutes and Regulations.” Alaska Department of Labor and Workforce Development, https://labor.alaska.gov/lss/OSH_Regs_Statutes_Codes.pdf
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“Alaska OSHA: What you need to know.” BLR, https://www.blr.com/Workplace-Safety/Safety-Administration/OSHA–in-Alaska
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“Alaska Statutes, Title 18.” The Alaska State Legislature, http://www.akleg.gov/basis/statutes.asp#18.30
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“Title 8, Chapter 61.” The Alaska State Legislature, http://www.akleg.gov/basis/aac.asp#8.61
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“8 AAC 61.100.” The Alaska State Legislature, http://www.akleg.gov/basis/aac.asp#8.61.100
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“29 C.F.R. 1904.” United States Department of Labor, Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), https://www.osha.gov/laws-regs/regulations/standardnumber/1904
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“29 C.F.R. 1910.” United States Department of Labor, Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), https://www.osha.gov/laws-regs/regulations/standardnumber/1910
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“29 C.F.R. 1926.” United States Department of Labor, Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), https://www.osha.gov/laws-regs/regulations/standardnumber/1926
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“29 C.F.R. 1926, Subpart CC.” United States Department of Labor, Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), https://www.osha.gov/laws-regs/regulations/standardnumber/1926/1926SubpartCC