Cotinine (Nicotine) Drug Test - info-hero

Cotinine (Nicotine) Drug Test

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Cotinine (nicotine) can be detected in drug tests that specifically include it as part of the panel of drugs being tested. Health Street offers urine testing services that can identify drug use up to a week back. Although it cannot be tested in our hair drug tests, we do offer urine drug testing options that include cotinine in addition to many other substances. Tests can be scheduled by employers or individuals; just choose the location to get a drug test for cotinine and complete the registration. Then you (or whomever you specify) will receive a barcode, which should be presented at the facility when the person arrives for the nicotine test. Test results are fast, accurate, and reported securely in our online portal.

About Cotinine (Nicotine)

What Is Cotinine (Nicotine)?

Cotinine is the product produced by the body when nicotine enters its system, and the presence of cotinine can indicate the use of nicotine in a drug test. Nicotine is the drug itself, and is commonly associated with cigarettes. However, even before the introduction of cigarettes, it was consumed by pipe or cigar, chewed, or used in the form of smokeless tobacco known as “snuff.” For centuries, the use of nicotine or tobacco was a staple in society. Throughout World War I, cigarettes were even praised for their ability to relax injured soldiers and help with managing the pain.

As time progressed, we learned more about nicotine as an addictive substance, its ability to create addiction to tobacco products with thousands of dangerous chemicals, and how people may be exposed to these chemicals even if they are nonsmokers. Our knowledge of the harmful effects of tobacco products expanded, and regulations went into place to reduce the risks of ETS (Environmental Tobacco Smoke, or secondhand smoke). Advertising tobacco or cigarettes was banned, and pop culture began to encourage a smoke-free lifestyle, as portrayed in popular tv show episodes like Friends‘s “The One with the Hypnosis Tape” and Seinfeld‘s “The Abstinence.” Today, employers, family, or friends may choose to get a cotinine or nicotine drug test in order to protect the health and safety of themselves or others.

Popular Nicotine Street Names:

Many of the common street names for nicotine are associated with the tobacco products rather than nicotine alone. Some common names include:

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Cigs
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Smokes
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Chew
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Dip
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Cancer Sticks
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Butts
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Snuff
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Spit
Intended Use and Effects:

Nicotine may be used in NRTs (Nicotine Replacement Therapies) in order to help a person quit smoking or using tobacco products with minimal withdrawal symptoms. The FDA has approved a variety of options for NRTs, including patches, gums, sprays, and lozenges.

Side Effects of Nicotine

Nicotine is an addictive substance, and has proven to be even more addictive for younger people. Nicotine use can result in side effects. Some of these include:

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Increased heart rate
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Headaches
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Dizziness and confusion
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Changes in breathing
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Stomach pains
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Nausea
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Diarrhea

Too much nicotine can result in more severe side effects, and can be fatal for adults and children. In adolescents, brain development may also be negatively impacted. Since nicotine is often used in the form of tobacco products, more severe health effects may occur from the exposure to thousands of dangerous chemicals. Some of these include bronchitis, cancer, asthma, yellowing of teeth and bad breath, COPD, heart disease, and many more. The CDC states that “Smoking leads to disease and disability and harms nearly every organ system of the body. It is the leading cause of preventable death.”

Frequently Asked Questions

Is It Safe to Combine Nicotine and Adderall?

Many drug combinations can have side effects. It is best to seek the advice of your healthcare professional about your specific situation, as many factors can affect how drug interactions work.

How Long Does Nicotine Stay In Your Urine?

How long nicotine stays in your urine is dependent on several factors. Some of these include:

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Frequency of use
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Amount used
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User’s metabolism
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User’s age
Does Nicotine Show Up On a Drug Test?

Yes, cotinine (nicotine) can be detected in a drug test. However, the type of test may be a factor in whether or not it will show up. The test that you or your employer chooses must specifically include nicotine or cotinine as part of the panel of drugs being tested.

Why Drug Test for Nicotine or Cotinine?

Nicotine is associated with many health risks, which can also affect nearby individuals depending on how it is used. Employers or individuals may choose to get a urine cotinine test (or nicotine test) in order to protect the health and safety of themselves or the people around them. Health Street offers a variety of nicotine drug tests to help ensure a safe work or home environment, and possibly open the door to recovery for someone who may be at risk for addiction, death, or other health complications.

Cotinine or Nicotine Drug Test Options

These nicotine drug testing options can be ordered by both individuals and employers. Whether you’re an employer seeking to maintain a drug-free workplace or an individual looking to drug test yourself or a family member, we have a drug testing solution for you. Health Street offers the following nicotine tests.

Nicotine Urine Tests:
Nicotine Test$85
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5 Panel Urine Drug Test + Nicotine$109
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5 Panel + Nicotine w/o THC$109
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5 Panel + Alcohol + Nicotine$135
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10 Panel Urine Drug Test + Nicotine$129
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10 Panel + Nicotine w/o THC$129
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10 Panel + Alcohol + Nicotine$145
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12 Panel Urine Drug Test + Nicotine$174
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12 Panel + Nicotine w/o THC$174
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20 Panel + Rohypnol, SOMA, & Nicotine$475
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Citations

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Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (2015, July 21). 2000 Surgeon General’s Report Highlights: Tobacco Timeline. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. https://www.cdc.gov/tobacco/data_statistics/sgr/2000/highlights/historical/index.htm.
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Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (2017, April 7). Cotinine Factsheet. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. https://www.cdc.gov/biomonitoring/Cotinine_FactSheet.html.
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Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (2021, February 15). Overviews of Diseases/Conditions. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. https://www.cdc.gov/tobacco/campaign/tips/diseases/index.html?s_cid=OSH_tips_GL0006&utm_source=google&utm_medium=cpc&utm_campaign=TipsRegular%2B2021%3BS%3BWL%3BBR%3BIMM%3BDTC%3BCO&utm_content=Effects%2Bof%2BSmoking_P&utm_term=effects%2Bof%2Bsmoking&gclid=EAIaIQobChMI-r6mkbr08QIV9G5vBB3Q8g5YEAAYASAAEgKH9fD_BwE&gclsrc=aw.ds.
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Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (2021, July 7). Quick Facts on the Risks of E-cigarettes for Kids, Teens, and Young Adults. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. https://www.cdc.gov/tobacco/basic_information/e-cigarettes/Quick-Facts-on-the-Risks-of-E-cigarettes-for-Kids-Teens-and-Young-Adults.html.
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National Institute on Drug Abuse. (2021, June 10). Cigarettes and Other Tobacco Products DrugFacts. National Institute on Drug Abuse. https://www.drugabuse.gov/publications/drugfacts/cigarettes-other-tobacco-products.
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Products, C. for T. (2020, August 28). Nicotine: The Addictive Chemical in Tobacco Products. U.S. Food and Drug Administration. https://www.fda.gov/tobacco-products/health-information/nicotine-addictive-chemical-tobacco-products.
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Seo, A. D., Kim, D. C., Yu, H. J., & Kang, M. J. (2016, December). Accidental ingestion of E-cigarette liquid nicotine in a 15-month-old child: an infant mortality case of nicotine intoxication. National Center for Biotechnology Information. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5300914/.