Holiday Lights Support Addicts in MD

Jim and Helen Kurtz are using their usual holiday decorations to send a message of hope as a way to show support for drug addicts and those who love them.
Nina Fenton
Published on

Now that Thanksgiving has come and gone, many around the country are pulling out their holiday decorations and adorning their homes with twinkling lights, snowmen, reindeer, Santa’s, menorahs, wreaths and more. Some neighborhoods take their holiday decorations very seriously, especially the folks on Corinthian Court in Harford County, Maryland.

The home owned by Jim and Helen Kurtz is no exception and is currently decked out with 16,000 lights that were programmed by hand and synced to ten holiday favorites. Mr. Kurtz said he spent over two weeks working his magic on his house and selecting the perfect songs and light sequences to dazzle all who came to see the light show.

A Light Show Like No Other

This year the Kurtz’s have decided to incorporate something extra special into their decorating as a way to show support for those who are struggling with heroin addiction in the nation, especially for those in Harford County who are overdosing at least once every 48 hours, with over 118 occurring already this year. A point that couldn’t hit any closer to the heart of the Kurtz home.

Controlling the music and lights from a little laptop, Mr. Kurtz said, “Before the next song begins, we’d like to take a few seconds to bring focus to the tens of thousands of Americans who suffer from the disease of addiction.”

Fittingly, Fight Song by Rachel Platten played as the lights on the house danced in a moving message of hope that was inspired by and dedicated to their daughter, Caroline, who has been fighting a hard battle against heroin.

You can’t help but feel a lump in your throat for what Caroline and so many others are up against while watching the lights pulse in time to an anthem for those in recovery as Platten sings:

This is my fight song

Take back my life song

Prove I’m alright song

My power’s turned on

Starting right now I’ll be strong

I’ll play my fight song

And I don’t really care if nobody else believes me

‘Cause I’ve still got a lot of fight left in me

A Family’s Fight for Recovery

Caroline isn’t the only brave one fighting heroin in the Kurtz family, though, as her parents have donned their armor and are trudging through the darkness right along with her. Despite how hard it’s been, Mrs. Kurtz is embracing the battle wounds her family has endured and is using them as a way to inspire and educate anyone and everyone touched by addiction.

“We’ve been dealing with our daughter’s drug addiction for a few years now and we thought, we finally became brave enough to put it out there. It’s a slow road, you know, it’s a road out of hell, but you can get out. The one thing we always said was that it could not happen to us. And that’s one takeway you need to be aware of, it can happen to you, addiction can happen to anyone, it’s not choosy about who it happens to.”

Caroline has fought hard and is working on taking back her life while she continues to work on her recovery while living in a halfway house. She’ll be home with her family for Christmas, which is likely the best gift her parents could ever ask for.

See the Kurtz’s light show for yourself, but make sure you keep the tissues handy…

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WRITTEN BY

A bit about me... I was born on a hot August day in a tiny hospital in Fulda a small city in rural Hesse, Germany where my father was stationed with the United States Army. I entered this world much the same way I have spent the last 31 years, stubborn, Read More

WRITTEN BY

A bit about me... I was born on a hot August day in a tiny hospital in Fulda a small city in rural Hesse, Germany where my father was stationed with the United States Army. I entered this world much the same way I have spent the last 31 years, stubborn, Read More

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